Colorectal surgery in cirrhotic patients

Paolino J, Steinhagen RM. Colorectal surgery in cirrhotic patients. ScientificWorldJournal. 2014 Jan 15;2014:239293. Free full-text.

Patients with cirrhosis have a greater risk of morbidity and mortality following colorectal surgery. Therefore, preoperative medical optimization and risk assessment using criteria such as the MELD score are vital in preventing complications. Some risk factors include age, urgency of surgery, and ASA score. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are related to portal hypertension, ascites, infection, and anastomotic and stomal complications. This review highlights the assessment of risk and perioperative management of cirrhotic patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

Article of interest: Clinical practice guideline for the management of anorectal abscess, fistula-in-ano, and rectovaginal fistula

Vogel JD, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Anorectal Abscess, Fistula-in-Ano, and Rectovaginal Fistula. Dis Colon Rectum. 2016 Dec;59(12):1117-1133. Full-text for Emory users.

Recommendations: Treatment of Rectovaginal Fistulas (p. 1123-1125)

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Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases

Kleive D, et al. Simultaneous Resection of Primary Colorectal Cancer and Synchronous Liver Metastases: Contemporary Practice, Evidence and Knowledge Gaps. Oncol Ther. 2021 Jun;9(1):111-120. Free full-text.

Key Summary Points

  • High-level evidence in simultaneous resection of colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastasis remains scarce.
  • Simultaneous resections may be considered in patients with good performance status and limited liver tumour burden.
  • Simultaneous resections should be avoided when requiring major liver resection and major colorectal resection.
  • Treatment strategies should be made by a multidisciplinary team.
  • Simultaneous resections should be performed as part of a clinical trial.
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Article of interest: Intracorporeal and extracorporeal anastomosis for robotic-assisted and laparoscopic right colectomy: short-term outcomes of a multi-center prospective trial.

Cleary RK, Silviera M, Reidy TJ, et al. Intracorporeal and extracorporeal anastomosis for robotic-assisted and laparoscopic right colectomy: short-term outcomes of a multi-center prospective trial. Surg Endosc. 2021 Nov 1. doi: 10.1007/s00464-021-08780-9.

Full-text for Emory users.

Results: There were 280 patients: 156 in the robotic assisted and laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis (IA) group and 124 in the robotic assisted and laparoscopic extracorporeal anastomosis (EA) group. The EA group was older (mean age 67 vs. 65 years, p = 0.05) and had fewer white (81% vs. 90%, p = 0.05) and Hispanic (2% vs. 12%, p = 0.003) patients. The EA group had more patients with comorbidities (82% vs. 72%, p = 0.04) while there was no significant difference in individual comorbidities between groups. IA was associated with fewer conversions to open and hand-assisted laparoscopic approaches (p = 0.007), shorter extraction site incision length (4.9 vs. 6.2 cm; p ≤ 0.0001), and longer operative time (156.9 vs. 118.2 min). Postoperatively, patients with IA had shorter time to first flatus, (1.5 vs. 1.8 days; p ≤ 0.0001), time to first bowel movement (1.6 vs. 2.0 days; p = 0.0005), time to resume soft/regular diet (29.0 vs. 37.5 h; p = 0.0014), and shorter length of hospital stay (median, 3 vs. 4 days; p ≤ 0.0001). Postoperative complication rates were comparable between groups.

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Iatrogenic urologic injuries 

Ferrara M, Kann BR. Urological injuries during colorectal surgery. Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2019 May;32(3):196-203.

“A recent retrospective population-based study of patients in the United States undergoing colorectal surgery found the overall incidence of ureteral injury to be 0.28%. The incidence was found to be significantly higher in patients with stage 3 or 4 cancer, malnutrition, steroid use, and in operations done at teaching hospitals. Rectal cancer cases were found to have the highest rates of ureteral injuries (7.1/1,000), followed by Crohn’s disease and diverticular disease (2.9/1,000 each). In this review, laparoscopic surgery was associated with a lower incidence of ureteral injuries when compared with open (1.1 vs. 2.8/1,000, p  < 0.001). Of the specific operations reviewed, abdominoperineal resection (APR) was found to have the highest rate of ureteral injury at 7.1/1,000 cases.” (Ferrara, 2019, p. 196)

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Article of interest: Serum C-reactive protein is a useful marker to exclude anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery

Messias BA, et al. Serum C-reactive protein is a useful marker to exclude anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. Sci Rep. 2020 Feb 3;10(1):1687.

Abstract: Anastomotic leakage is a complication of colorectal surgery. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase marker that can indicate surgical complications. We determined whether serum CRP levels in patients who had undergone colorectal surgery can be used to exclude the presence of anastomotic leakage and allow safe early discharge. We included 90 patients who underwent colorectal surgery with primary anastomosis. Serum CRP levels were measured retrospectively on postoperative days (PODs) 1 – 7. Patients with anastomotic leakage (n = 11) were compared to those without leakage (n = 79). We statistically analysed data and plotted receiver operating characteristic curves. The incidence of anastomotic leakage was 12.2%. Diagnoses were made on PODs 3 – 24. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% (18.2% in the leakage group, 1.3% in the non-leakage group; P < 0.045). CRP levels were most accurate on POD 4, with a cutoff level of 180 mg/L, showing an area under the curve of 0.821 and a negative predictive value of 97.2%. Lower CRP levels after POD 2 and levels <180 mg/L on POD 4 may indicate the absence of anastomotic leakage and may allow safe discharge of patients who had undergone colorectal surgery with primary anastomosis.

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The utility of intraoperative perfusion assessment during resection of colorectal cancer

De Nardi P, et al. Intraoperative angiography with indocyanine green to assess anastomosis perfusion in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection: results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Surg Endosc. 2020 Jan;34(1):53-60.

Full-text for Emory users.

Results: After randomization, 12 patients were excluded. Accordingly, 240 patients were included in the analysis; 118 were in the study group, and 122 in the control group. ICG angiography showed insufficient perfusion of the colic stump, which led to extended bowel resection in 13 cases (11%). An anastomotic leak developed in 11 patients (9%) in the control group and in 6 patients (5%) in the study group (p = n.s.).

Conclusions: Intraoperative ICG fluorescent angiography can effectively assess vascularization of the colic stump and anastomosis in patients undergoing colorectal resection. This method led to further proximal bowel resection in 13 cases, however, there was no statistically significant reduction of anastomotic leak rate in the ICG arm.

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