Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases

Kleive D, et al. Simultaneous Resection of Primary Colorectal Cancer and Synchronous Liver Metastases: Contemporary Practice, Evidence and Knowledge Gaps. Oncol Ther. 2021 Jun;9(1):111-120. Free full-text.

Key Summary Points

  • High-level evidence in simultaneous resection of colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastasis remains scarce.
  • Simultaneous resections may be considered in patients with good performance status and limited liver tumour burden.
  • Simultaneous resections should be avoided when requiring major liver resection and major colorectal resection.
  • Treatment strategies should be made by a multidisciplinary team.
  • Simultaneous resections should be performed as part of a clinical trial.
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Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion (PHP) with Melphalan

Karydis I, Gangi A, Wheater MJ, et al. Percutaneous hepatic perfusion with melphalan in uveal melanoma: A safe and effective treatment modality in an orphan disease. J Surg Oncol. 2018 May;117(6):1170-1178.

Figure 1. Melphalan percutaneous hepatic perfusion (M-PHP) circuit.

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Results: A total of 51 patients received 134 M‐PHP procedures (median of 2 M‐PHPs). 25 (49%) achieved a partial (N = 22, 43.1%) or complete hepatic response (N = 3, 5.9%). In 17 (33.3%) additional patients, the disease stabilized for at least 3 months, for a hepatic disease control rate of 82.4%. After median follow‐up of 367 days, median overall progression free (PFS) and hepatic progression free survival (hPFS) was 8.1 and 9.1 months, respectively and median overall survival was 15.3 months. There were no treatment related fatalities. Non‐hematologic grade 3‐4 events were seen in 19 (37.5%) patients and were mainly coagulopathic (N = 8) and cardiovascular (N = 9).

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Rate of postoperative biliary complications during major liver resection reduced by intraoperative air leak test

Zimmitti G, Vauthey JN, et al. Systematic use of an intraoperative air leak test
at the time of major liver resection reduces the rate of postoperative biliary
complications. J Am Coll Surg. 2013 Dec;217(6):1028-37.

Free full-text.

STUDY DESIGN: Rates of postoperative biliary complications were compared among 103 patients who underwent ALT and 120 matched patients operated on before ALT was used. All study patients underwent major hepatectomy without bile duct resection at 3 high-volume hepatobiliary centers between 2008 and 2012. The ALT was performed by placement of a transcystic cholangiogram catheter to inject air into the biliary tree, the upper abdomen was filled with saline, and the distal common bile duct was manually occluded. Uncontrolled bile ducts were identified by localization of air bubbles at the transection surface and were directly repaired.

RESULTS: The 2 groups were similar in diagnosis, chemotherapy use, tumor number and size, resection extent, surgery duration, and blood loss (all, p > 0.05). Single or multiple uncontrolled bile ducts were intraoperatively detected and repaired in 62.1% of ALT vs 8.3% of non-ALT patients (p < 0.001). This resulted in a lower rate of postoperative bile leaks in ALT (1.9%) vs non-ALT patients (10.8%; p = 0.008). Independent risk factors for postoperative bile leaks included extended hepatectomy (p = 0.031), caudate resection (p = 0.02), and not performing ALT (p = 0.002) (odds ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.3-11.8; odds ratio = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.3; and odds ratio = 11.8; 95% CI, 2.4-58.8, respectively).


More forthcoming…

Air cholangiogram as effective measure for postoperative biliary complications

One discussion this week involved air cholangiograms.


Reference: Zimmitti G, et al. Systematic use of an intraoperative air leak test at the time of major liver resection reduces the rate of postoperative biliary complications. Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2013 Dec;217(6):1028-1037. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2013.07.392.

Summary: Advances in surgical technique and better understanding of liver anatomy and physiology have facilitated a decrease in postoperative hepatic insufficiency rates and in perioperative blood transfusion needs. However, these improvements have not been paralleled by a decrease in the rate of postoperative bile leak, which remains the Achilles’ heel of liver resection. While in many cases a postoperative bile leak can be managed successfully with drainage and antibiotics, it almost always entails longer length of stay and increased hospital costs.

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Simultaneous vs staged colorectal and hepatic resections

One discussion this week involved the comparison of simultaneous and staged resections of colorectal cancer and synchronous colorectal liver metastases (SCRLM).


Reference: Reddy SK, et al. Simultaneous resections of colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases: a multi-institutional analysis. Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2007 Dec;14(12):3481-3491. doi:10.1245/s10434-007-9522-5

Summary: In a retrospective study of 610 patients at three institutions between 1985 and 2006, the authors compared postoperative morbidity and mortality after simultaneous and staged resections of colorectal cancer and SCRLM.

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