The FOxTROT (Fluoropyrimidine, Oxaliplatin, and Targeted-Receptor pre-Operative Therapy [Panitumumab]) Trial

Seymour MT, Morton D. FOxTROT: an international randomised controlled trial in 1052 patients (pts) evaluating neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for colon cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2019 May;37(15 Suppl):3504-3504.

Conclusions: NAC was well tolerated and safe, with no increase in perioperative morbidity and a trend toward fewer serious postoperative complications. Evidence of histological regression was seen in 59% pts after NAC, including some pCRs. This resulted in marked histological downstaging and a halving of the rate of incomplete resections. We observed an improvement in 2-yr failure rate (HR=0.77), but this fell short of statistical significance (p=0.11). NAC for colon cancer improves surgical outcomes and can now be considered as a treatment option; longer follow-up and further trials are required to confirm the long-term benefits, refine its use and optimise case selection. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00647530


Foxtrot Collaborative Group. Feasibility of preoperative chemotherapy for locally advanced, operable colon cancer: the pilot phase of a randomised controlled trial. Lancet Oncol. 2012 Nov;13(11):1152-60.

The FOxTrOT website (University of Birmingham)

Bile Cultures are Poor Predictors of Antibiotic Resistance in Postoperative Infections Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

Maxwell DW, Jajja MR, Ferez-Pinzon A, Pouch SM, Cardona K, Kooby DA, Maithel SK, Russell MC, Sarmiento JM. Bile cultures are poor predictors of antibiotic resistance in postoperative infections following pancreaticoduodenectomy.HPB (Oxford). 2019 Oct 26:S1365-182X(19)30756-7.

Results: Common patient characteristics of 522 included patients were 65-years-old, Caucasian (75.5%), male (54.2%), malignant indication (79.3%), and preoperative biliary stent (59.0%). Overall, 275 (89.6%) BCs matured identifiable isolates with 152 (55.2%) demonstrating polymicrobial growth. Ninety-two (17.6%) SOICs were obtained: 48 and 44 occurred in patients with and without intraoperative BCs. Stents were associated with bacteriobilia (85.7%, K = 0.947, p < 0.001; OR 22.727, p < 0.001), but not postoperative infections (15.2%; K = 0.302, p < 0.001; OR 1.428, p = 0.122). Forty-eight patients demonstrated paired BC/SOICs to evaluate. Pathogenic concordance of this group was 31.1% (K = 0.605, p < 0.001) while SRP concordance of matched pathogens was 46.7% (K = 0.167, p = 0.008).

Conclusion: Bile cultures demonstrate poor concordance with the susceptibility/resistance patterns of postoperative infections following pancreaticoduodenectomy and may lead to inappropriate antibiotic therapies.

Article of interest: Oncological Outcomes After Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for Colon or Rectal Cancer: Increased Risk of Local Recurrence

Koedam TWA, et al.; COLOR COLOR II study group. Oncological Outcomes After Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for Colon or Rectal Cancer: Increased Risk of Local Recurrence. Ann Surg. 2020 Mar 27. [Epub ahead of print]

Results: For colon cancer, anastomotic leakage was not associated with increased percentage of local recurrence or decreased disease-free-survival. For rectal cancer, an increase of local recurrences (13.3% vs 4.6%; hazard ratio 2.96; 95% confidence interval 1.38-6.34; P = 0.005) and a decrease of disease-free survival (53.6% vs 70.9%; hazard ratio 1.67; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.41; P = 0.006) at 5-year follow-up were found in patients with anastomotic leakage.

Conclusion: Short-term morbidity, mortality, and long-term oncological outcomes are negatively influenced by the occurrence of anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery. For colon cancer, no significant effect was observed; however, due to low power, no conclusions on the influence of anastomotic leakage on outcomes after colon surgery could be reached. Clinical awareness of increased risk of local recurrence after anastomotic leakage throughout the follow-up is mandatory.

Article of interest: LekCheck: A Prospective Study to Identify Perioperative Modifiable Risk Factors for Anastomotic Leakage in Colorectal Surgery

Huisman DE, Reudink M, van Rooijen SJ, et al. LekCheck: A Prospective Study to Identify Perioperative Modifiable Risk Factors for Anastomotic Leakage in Colorectal Surgery. Ann Surg. 2020 Jun 4. [Epub ahead of print]

Full-text for Emory users.

Objective: To assess potentially modifiable perioperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage in adult patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

Summary background data: Colorectal anastomotic leakage (CAL) is the single most important denominator of postoperative outcome after colorectal surgery. To lower the risk of CAL, the current research focused on the association of potentially modifiable risk factors, both surgical and anesthesiological.

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Article of Interest: Development of a Surgical Evidence Blog at Morbidity and Mortality Conferences: Integrating Clinical Librarians to Enhance Resident Education

Lovasik BP, Rutledge H, Lawson E, Maithel SK, Delman KA. (2020). Development of a Surgical Evidence Blog at Morbidity and Mortality Conferences: Integrating Clinical Librarians to Enhance Resident Education. Journal of Surgical Education. [In Press, Available online 15 June 2020.]

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Lance-Adams syndrome

Marcellino C, Wijdicks EF. Posthypoxic action myoclonus (the Lance Adams syndrome). BMJ Case Rep. 2020 Apr 16;13(4):e234332.

Free full-text. (Includes video.)

  • Action myoclonus is exceptionally rare (less than 0.5% in a series of patients who have a cardiac arrest).
  • Myoclonus occurring after hypoxic brain injury from cardiac arrest, characterised by abrupt irregular muscle contractions. (1)
    • Acute: starting within 48 hours after the arrest (when isolated, sometimes terms acute Lance-Adams syndrome). (2)
    • Chronic: Lance-Adams syndrome, which may start from days to weeks after arrest and progressively worsen, with or without other neurological symptoms.
  • Potentially confused with myoclonus status in a comatose patient, yet the examination, imaging, degree of disability and prognosis are very divergent.
  • Typically, no EEG seizure correlates.

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Versus Percutaneous Catheter Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis in High Risk Patients (CHOCOLATE): Multicentre Randomised Clinical Trial

Loozen CS, et al. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy versus percutaneous catheter drainage for acute cholecystitis in high risk patients (CHOCOLATE): multicentre randomised clinical trial. BMJ. 2018 Oct 8; 363:k3965.

Free full-text.

what this study adds

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The value of a cross-discipline team-based approach for resection of renal cell carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus: A report of a large, contemporary, single-institution experience.

Master VA, Ethun CG, Kooby DA, Staley CA 3rd, Maithel SK. The value of a cross-discipline team-based approach for resection of renal cell carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus: A report of a large, contemporary, single-institution experience. J Surg Oncol. 2018 Dec; 118(8):1219-1226.

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Introduction: We report the evolution of the largest, contemporary, single-institution experience with this complex procedure to highlight the value of a cross-discipline, team-based approach.

Methods: Patients from a prospectively maintained database who underwent resection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus from 2005 to 2016 at a single-institution were included for analysis.

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Article of interest: COVID-19 associated hyperviscosity: a link between inflammation and thrombophilia?

Maier CL, Truong AD, Auld SC, Polly DM, Tanksley CL, Duncan A. COVID-19 associated hyperviscosity: a link between inflammation and thrombophilia? Lancet. 2020 May 25:S0140-6736(20)31209-5. Epub ahead of print.

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“The 15 patients had plasma viscosity exceeding 95% of normal, as determined by traditional capillary viscometry, ranging from 1·9–4·2 centipoise (cP; normal range 1·4–1·8). Notably, the four patients with plasma viscosity above 3·5 cP had a documented thrombotic complication: one patient had pulmonary embolism, one patient had limb ischaemia and suspected pulmonary embolism, and two patients had CRRT-related clotting. Plasma viscosity and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores, a measure of illness severity, were strongly correlated (Pearson’s r=0·841, R2=0·7072, p<0·001; appendix).”


Emory doctors study link between thickness of blood, clotting and inflammation in COVID-19 patients.