Article of interest: Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of Aaorta Use in Nontrauma Emergency General Surgery: A Multi-institutional Experience.

Hatchimonji JS, Chipman AM, McGreevy DT, et al. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of Aaorta Use in Nontrauma Emergency General Surgery: A Multi-institutional Experience. J Surg Res. 2020 Dec;256:149-155.

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Background: The aim of this study was to determine the current utilization patterns of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of aorta (REBOA) for hemorrhage control in nontrauma patients.

Methods: Data on REBOA use in nontrauma emergency general surgery patients from six centers, 2014-2019, was pooled for analysis. We performed descriptive analyses using Fisher’s exact, Student’s t, chi-squared, or Mann-Whitney U tests as appropriate.

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The balanced resuscitation approach

“Balanced resuscitation minimizes coagulopathy through permissive hypotension, restrictive crystalloid use, and high ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusion.” (Cantle, 2017, p. 999)


Holcomb JB, Tilley BC, Baraniuk S, et al. Transfusion of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 ratio and mortality in patients with severe trauma: the PROPPR randomized clinical trial.Transfusion of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 ratio and mortality in patients with severe trauma: the PROPPR randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2015 Feb 3;313(5):471-82.

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“Exsanguination, the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2%) vs the 1:1:2 group (14.6%) (difference, −5.4% [95% CI, −10.4% to −0.5%], P = .03); the median time to death due to exsanguination was 106 minutes interquartile range [IQR], 54 to 198 minutes) and 96 minutes (IQR, 43 to 194 minutes), respectively. From 24 hours through 30 days, the numbers of additional all-cause deaths were similar (32 for the 1:1:1 group vs 31 for the 1:1:2 group). Over 30 days, deaths due to exsanguination occurred in 10.7% of patients in the 1:1:1 group vs 14.7% in the 1:1:2 group, whereas deaths due to traumatic brain injury were 8.1% vs 10.3%, respectively. Additional causes of death were infrequent and are shown in Table 3. More patients achieved anatomic hemostasis in the 1:1:1 group (86.1% vs 78.1% in the 1:1:2 group, P = .006) with a median time of 105 minutes (IQR, 64 to 179 minutes) vs 100 minutes (IQR, 56 to 181 minutes), respectively (P = .44) in those who achieved anatomic hemostasis (Table 2).” (Holcomb, 2015, p. 475)

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