Article of Interest: Management of intussusception in patients with melanoma

Perez MC, Sun J, Farley C, Han D, Sun AH, Narayan D, Lowe M, Delman KA, Messina JL, Gonzalez RJ, Sondak VK, Khushalani NI, Zager JS. Management of intussusception in patients with melanoma. J Surg Oncol. 2019 Jun;119(7):897-902.

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Background: Increased cross-sectional imaging for surveillance of metastatic melanoma has led to more diagnoses of asymptomatic intussusception.

Methods: We performed a multi-institutional retrospective review of patient records with a history of metastatic melanoma and a diagnosis of intussusception. Patients were divided into three groups: 1) asymptomatic patients without current evidence of melanoma (no evidence of disease [NED]); 2) asymptomatic intussusception and known active metastatic melanoma; 3) symptomatic intussusception and known active metastatic melanoma; the number of patients requiring surgery and intraoperative findings were recorded.

Results: We reviewed 73 patients diagnosed with intussusception from 2004 to 2017. Among asymptomatic patients with NED (n = 16), 14 spontaneously resolved and 2 underwent pre-emptive surgery without abnormal intraoperative findings. Of asymptomatic patients with active metastatic disease (n = 32), 25 were initially observed and 7 underwent pre-emptive surgery and 9 of the 25 initially observed patients required surgery for development of symptoms. In this group, all 16 patients undergoing surgery (50% of the group) had intraoperative findings of intussusception and/or metastatic intestinal melanoma.. All symptomatic patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 25) underwent surgery; all had intraoperative findings of intussusception and/or metastatic melanoma except 1 (Meckel’s diverticulum).

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For your review: Desmoplastic melanoma

Nicolson NG, Han D. Desmoplastic melanoma. J Surg Oncol. 2019 Jan;119(2):208-215. doi: 10.1002/jso.25317. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Desmoplastic melanoma (DM) is a rare melanoma variant that has unique biology and pathology compared with conventional melanoma (non-DM). Importantly, DM is classified into pure and mixed histologic subtypes, which have been correlated with outcomes. Management of DM broadly mirrors that of non-DM; however, there are unique considerations for DM that influence treatment approaches. This paper will provide a contemporary overview of this disease and will review the literature regarding the management of DM.

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Article of interest: The Landmark Series: MSLT-1, MSLT-2 and DeCOG (Management of Lymph Nodes)

Bello DM, Faries MB. The Landmark Series: MSLT-1, MSLT-2 and DeCOG (Management of Lymph Nodes). Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Jan;27(1):15-21.

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Management of regional lymph nodes in patients with melanoma has evolved significantly in recent years. The value of nodal intervention, long utilized for its perceived therapeutic benefit, has now shifted to that of a critical prognostic procedure used to guide clinical decision making. This review focuses on the three landmark, randomized controlled trials evaluating the role of surgery for regional lymph nodes in melanoma: Multicenter Selective Lymphadenectomy Trial I (MSLT-I), German Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group-Selective Lymphadenectomy Trial (DeCOG-SLT), and Multicenter Selective Lymphadenectomy Trial II (MSLT-II).